Adam Kakaati, the owner of Nuriyah Café (left) in the southwest Sydney suburb of Gregory Hills, said Vari Desho (right) is the best barista in town despite suffering from Tourette Syndrome

Sydney café, Nuriyah Cafe, owner defends employee with Tourette Syndrome

Read the one-star restaurant review an angry customer left a café because their barista with a disability made them ‘uncomfortable’ – as the trendy eatery fires back in an epic way

  • A cafe owner stood up for his employee after a review criticizing his disability
  • Review said a barista at the café, who has Tourettes, made them uncomfortable
  • Adam Kakaati, the cafe owner, said the review was insensitive and angered him

An upset café boss has rushed to defend one of his employees after a nasty online review criticizing the barista’s disability.

Adam Kakaati, the owner of Nuriyah Café in the southwest Sydney suburb of Gregory Hills, said Vari Desho is the best barista in town despite suffering from Tourette Syndrome.

However, an angry customers said Mr Desho’s ‘tics’ – involuntary noises or movements – caused them to leave the café without eating or paying for their food because they were uncomfortable.

Adam Kakaati, the owner of Nuriyah Café (left) in the southwest Sydney suburb of Gregory Hills, said Vari Desho (right) is the best barista in town despite suffering from Tourette Syndrome

The customer gave Nuriyah Cafe a one-star review because Mr Desho's Tourettes Syndrome made them uncomfortable (pictured, the negative review)

The customer gave Nuriyah Cafe a one-star review because Mr Desho’s Tourettes Syndrome made them uncomfortable (pictured, the negative review)

‘Unfortunately the front of house team member had a physical condition which we initially dismissed,’ the review said.

‘It causes him to ‘bark’ and as we said, we thought it would pass especially as when he took our order it stopped completely.

‘Unfortunately it then got much worse and much louder and more constant. We felt sooo bad and really wanted to stay but when it got so bad we couldn’t even have a conversation we very reluctantly had to cancel our order and leave.’

Mr Kakaati was quick to fire back with a post of his own.

‘Today at Nuriyah it was brought to our attention that a customer took it upon themselves to post a negative review regarding one of our employees,’ he wrote on Facebook.

‘Here at Nuriyah we treat all our staff & customers like family and we wanted to address how we feel about the incident that occurred, over the weekend.

‘We welcome and support anyone with a life changing condition.’

The defensive boss later said the review made him ‘so angry’ because Mr Desho isn’t able to help his condition.

‘His knowledge towards coffee, everything about the machine, and the way he makes it, no one does it better than him,’ Mr Kaakati told the Herald Sun.

Adam Kakaati said his employees at Nuriyah Cafe are 'like family' and said the review made him 'so' because Mr Desho didn't do anything wrong (pictured, food from Nuriyah Cafe)

Adam Kakaati said his employees at Nuriyah Cafe are ‘like family’ and said the review made him ‘so’ because Mr Desho didn’t do anything wrong (pictured, food from Nuriyah Cafe)

‘I told him don’t ever say sorry to someone like that. You haven’t done anything wrong.

‘People said ‘he might affect your business’, but I don’t care. He has a family to provide for and he’s one of the best workers I have.’

Commenters underneath Mr Kakaati’s emotional post also defended Mr Desho and called out the reviewer for being insensitive.

‘I know this man personally, and it is very heartbreaking to see someone go to such lengths to write a review like that,’ one person wrote.

‘He is such a nice man, who would do anything to make sure you are happy and comfortable. Shame on you.’

‘It makes me so happy to see a business that supports inclusion and stands by it when challenged. It’s people like this that will make positive change when it comes to stigma and judgment,’ another said.

What is Tourette Syndrome?

Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neurological disorder, which most often begins between the ages of 2 and 21, and lasts throughout life.

TS is NOT degenerative and people with TS can expect to live a normal life span.

Symptoms:

TS is characterised by rapid, repetitive and involuntary muscle movements and vocalisations called ‘tics’, and often involves behavioral difficulties.

The term ‘involuntary’, used to describe tics, is a source of confusion since it is known that most people with TS do have some control over their symptoms.

What is often not recognised is that the control which can be exerted, from seconds to hours at a time, only delays more severe outbursts of symptoms.

Tics are experienced as a build up of tension, are irresistible and eventually must be performed.

Typically tics increase as a result of tension or stress and decrease with relaxation or concentration on an absorbing task.

TS symptoms have long been misconstrued as a sign of behavioral abnormality or ‘nervous habits’, which they are not.

Source: Tourette.org

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